diebedra.de

Bücher, Filme, Technik und Benedict Cumberbatch – auf Deutsch and in English

Suchergebnis: "Alan Turing" (Seite 1 von 3)

Jim Ottaviani: Alan Turing in a comic book

Welcome, reader! Or should I write: Welcome user? Either way, it may be possible that you won’t be able to read this at all: Without the help of Alan Turing the invention of modern computers may have been quite different. Even if you are not a mathematician you may have stumbled upon Alan Turing and you may connect his name  with the Enigma. A machine that Germans used to encrypt their messages during World War II. and nearly helped them win that war. Of course this is the story of the Comic book „Alan Turing Decoded“ by Jim Ottaviani and Leland Purvis which I think can be seen as a summary of Andrew Hodges‘ „The Imitation Game“ – at least this is what came to my mind when I enjoyed reading it and of course I thought of the film, too (sorry, fangirl here).

A bit different

But the book also brings that brilliant man Alan Turing (of course he had lots of helping hands back in World War II in Bletchley Park) to life who always was a bit awkward and different compared to others. He ran miles on end, wore a gas mask as a prevention from hay fever, chained his mug to his heater in his office at Bletchley Park  – and he was a homosexual when this was illegal in Great Britain. Sadly enough he was prosecuted for that  – a treatment that may have been the reason why Alan took his own life. Though the circumstances are still unclear as Jim Ottaviani writes in his author’s note.

Of course this beautiful made comic book isn’t a documentary or biography on Alan Turing, so readers shouldn’t take any word or any picture as a historical fact. But it is a lovely way of getting the story of Alan Turing out to readers who don’t want to be bored by huge books with endless footage and bibliographical lists (although there are a few in this 232 page hardcopy, too) – but being entertained and touched by an intriguing life story with a tragic ending.

Photo: Petra Breunig

Photo: Petra Breunig

Jim Ottaviani, Leland Purvis (Illustrations): The Imitation Game, Alan Turing Decoded. Abrams, round 24$, £16, €16.

You may find more on Alan Turing on my blog – some of them are in German.

Prof Alan Turing decoded

What is the point in writing another biography of Alan Turing more than 60 years after his death? And what can be really new when you know Andrew Hodges‘ „Enigma“ which is both a thrilling approach to the professional life of the man who helped breaking the German Enigma code in the Second World War and an look inside the man who wasn’t allowed to live and love as a homosexual man in the UK of the 50s?

The point is that the author Dermot Turing, is Alan’s nephew and although he has never met his uncle, he takes the reader with „Prof – Alan Turing decoded“ inside the Turing family, presenting not only pictures you may not have seen before but also letters and notes scribbled by Alan when thinking about his work (which makes me wonder how his third notebook which was sold at an auction earlier this year may look like. ) Although the book is – as always when it comes to very specific scientific topics – not always an easy read. But even if you don’t have the brain of a mathematician  or a computer expert, you’ll can’t help but to be in awe of a man who apparently was awkward and brilliant as a codebreaker in Bletchley Park and as the father of the computer age, somehow way ahead of his time and down to earth in a stunningly pragmatic way.

„He was a strange character, a very reserved sort, but he mixed in with everyone quite well.“

A way that wasn’t always an easy one to cope with. Imagine Alan at your door at any time of day without any notice to announce his visit or him walking away when he found a conversation boring. But he easily connected with children whom he met on equal levels and talked seriously about such things as if God could catch a cold when he sat on wet grass.

„Prof“ is a biography about a man „who had something special which the rest of us do not“. It is worth reading.

 

Dermot Turing: Prof – Alan Turing decoded. A biography. The history press, about 20€/ 16£.

Further reading:
Alan Turing – his work and impact.

What Alan Turing was looking for at Ebermannstadt

It is not a peculiarity of our times that the NSA – America’s National Security Agency – wants to know everything, even in the most distant places of our planet. And Ticom (Target Intelligence Commitee), NSA’s predecessor, wanted just the same.

In the Second World War the future of the free world also depended on their spy work and therefore it isn’t surprising at all that Ticom of course knew about the activities at Feuerstein Castle near Ebermannstadt, in the northern part of Bavaria, Germany. Activities which were peculiar and mysterious at the same time. NSA documents which cover that part of history are only known to the public since 2009. They prove the fact that the British mathematician Alan Turing was on his way to Ebermannstadt in the last months of WW II. According to that documents German physician Oskar Vierling worked within the castle. The building which never has been a castle, was masked as a hospital – including the sign of the Red Cross on its roof – but was in fact a laboratory run by the Wehrmacht and the German Foreign Office. Up to 250 people worked in Feuerstein Castle on encryption, radio links and on the improvement of the encryption machine SZ 42.  Vierling who in 1941 established  the company that today still bears his name, worked on signals that should control torpedoes and set mines on fire.

On April 16th 1945, some three weeks before Nazi Germany surrendered on May 8th, Ticom secret agents arrived at Feuerstein Castle. The American and British experts on news and communication technique were hitchhiking all the way through Germany till they arrived in Upper Franconia. The last part up to the castle itself, they walked. They hoped to find German encryption devices there, not because they hoped to use it for themselves. „It was much more important that these devices were not lost to the Russians,“ Rudolf Staritz, a tech expert on news, says.

„Turing wasn’t able to breach Vierling’s messages.“

Alan Turing came across Vierling much earlier. Turing who at that time was breaking German messages at Bletchley Park, the central site of the United Kingdom’s Government Code and Cypher School known for its efficiency and its brilliant minds. But the messages which went to and from Feuerstein Castle and the German town of Hannover on a regular bases, remained a mystery even to genius Turing. „Turing wasn’t able to breach Vierling’s messages. So he wanted to go to Feuerstein and find out what was going on there for himself,“ Staritz says. The NSA documents don’t reveal, however, how long Alan Turing stayed at Feuerstein Castle in the spring of 1945. That the brilliant codebreaker was actually there, experts consider as a fact. „There are lots of legends when it comes to Turing’s life. But we can take it for granted that he was in Ebermannstadt,“ Jochan Viehoff says. He is Head of Nixdorf Museum in the German town Paderborn.

It seems that after the war, in April 1945, Vierling soon attached himself to the new situation – according to Ticom report dated May 1st 1945: „When Vierling and some of his colleagues were found, they were very eager to talk about their work and agreed to help rebuilding the lab and the parts of the project, so they could go on with their work.“ The secret agents assumed that Vierling hoped to continue his work within his laboratory at Feuerstein Castle after the end of Nazi regime. But the cooperation terminated when allies‘ superiors on August 16th 1945 ordered Vierling’s arrest. The agents removed all interiors and research results from Feuerstein. Staritz doesn’t believe they used it for their own research. „The Americans technically were much superior compared to the Germans.“

More about Alan Turing on this blog click here.
Learn more about Alan Turing here.

The German version of this article was originally published in Fränkischer Tag on January 22nd 2015.
The author, Christoph Hägele, kindly granted the permission to translate it.

Alan Turing – His work and impact

If you stumbled across Alan Turing because of the film „The Imitation Game“ starring Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead role, you may be aware of Andrew Hodges‘ biography „The Enigma“ – the basis of Graham Moore’s Oscar awarded screenplay.

A much deeper inside look at Alan Turing’s work which helped breaking the German enigma code, shortened the Second World War by at least two years and saved millions of lives, you should read the huge book „Alan Turing – His work and impact“ by S. Barry Cooper and Jan van Leewen. Yes, there are lots of mathematical theories, even formulas (something very awful for people like me unable to cope with numbers) but the more than 870 pages, accompanied by indexes and bibliographies are worth reading, browsing through essays about and from Alan.

„He was a genius: he was ‚a wonder of the world‘.
Bernards Richards about Alan Turing

One essay that strikes me most  – besides the ones by Alan himself which offer a look inside the brain of a man a colleague described as „a Wonder of the world“ – is the piece „Why Turing cracked the Enigma code and the Germans did not“ by Klaus Schmeh. The German computer scientist explains that Germans were unable to bring their cryptographers together to find a possible weakness in the Enigma code itself. Despite the fact that German experts were aware of a possible breach, Britain’s success in breaking Enigma was only revealed in the 1970s when details about the codebreaker’s work at Bletchley Park became public.

„Alan Turing – His work and impact“ may not be an easy read. But it is worth every try.

S.Barry Cooper, Jan van Leeuwen: Alan Turing – His work an impact, Elsevier, £ 53 can be ordered here.

Foto: pb

Foto: pb


Alan Turing – the codebreaker

It was a secret world behind the Victorian facade of the house in Bletchley Park some 70 kilometres Northwest of London. At the beginning of the second World War the British government realised that it would be essential to decode the messages of Nazi Germany to win the war. But all messages were encrypted with the help of Enigma machines – codes that everybody believed were unbreakable. At Bletchley Park analytics from all over Britain were gathered, sworn to secrecy and set to shifts 24 hours a day – a work that would be useless at the end of every day when the Germans changed their codes.

Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) in a trailer of "The Imitation Game". Screenshot: pb

Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) in a trailer of „The Imitation Game“. Screenshot: pb

 

„The Imitation Game“ which hits German cinemas at January 22nd celebrates and focuses on codebreaker Alan Turing, the unsung hero who helped to win the war for the allies. It is believed today that he shortened the war for about two years and saved millions of lives. Alan Turing (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) is one of the first experts in Bletchley Park. Born in 1912, he has just finished his studies in Cambridge and is „an odd duck“ according to his mother and colleagues. In his job interview right at the beginning of the film he calls himself one of the best mathematicians in the world, a genius who somehow lives in his own world but he discovers that Enigma can only be beaten by another machine. A machine –  the Turing bombe as it is called later –  that would work without interruptions and which he is eager to build against all odds. Only after Alan discovers by chance that some words will appear in every German message he and his colleagues are able to reduce the unbelievable numbers of possible codes so that the bombe is finally able to do its work. It’s an irony of history that the arrogant greeting „Heil Hitler“ – „Hail to Hitler“ helps the allies to win the war because these words are in fact hidden in every message.

But the life of the codebreakers at Bletchley Park isn’t to get easier at all. It is Alan who knowing that homosexuality is illegal tries to hide his biggest secret and protect his privacy while – at least in the film – is suspected to be a Russian spy. After World War II he isn’t celebrated as a war hero but sentenced to chemical castration to „heal“ his homosexuality. But the oestrogens not only caused growing breasts but left Alan unable to concentrate on his beloved work and he killed himself in 1954.

His work which is the basis of the modern computer technique and the internet was classified till 1970s. Queen Elizabeth granted Alan an Royal pardon on December 24th 2013 after the British Parliament refused to pardon Alan in 2011, even after former Prime Minister Gordon Brown apologized 2009 on behalf of the British government: „I am very proud to say: we’re sorry. You deserved so much better.“

Read my review of the film here.

The German version of this blog entry was first published in Fränkischer Tag and on infranken.de.

Alan Turing – ein echter Held

Der Zweite Weltkrieg ist auch bald 70 Jahre nach seinem Ende immer noch präsent, jedenfalls wenn man sich den Stoff ansieht, aus dem Filme und Bücher gemacht sind. Mit „The Imitation Game – Ein streng geheimes Leben“ (115min, Verleih: Square One) kommt am 22. Januar ein weiterer Film, der in dieser Zeit spielt, ins deutsche Kino. Doch er ist nicht einfach ein weiterer Film, der in dieser Zeit spielt.

„The Imitation Game“ ist ein Film über den auch bei uns weitgehend unbekannten Helden Alan Turing. Der englische Mathematiker war zusammen mit seinen Kollegen maßgeblich daran beteiligt, den Zweiten Weltkrieg – wie Experten heute meinen – um bis zu vier Jahre zu verkürzen und Millionen Leben zu retten, indem er den deutschen Enigma-Code knackte. Doch der Film ist weit davon entfernt im Pathos zu ersticken, denn er ist auch eine Tragödie. Turing, den Zeitgenossen als liebenswerten, aber etwas merkwürdigen Menschen beschreiben, tat immer das, wovon er überzeugt war. Er lebte für die Mathematik, in der er als Genie galt, er war witzig und er war homosexuell zu einer Zeit, in der das verboten war und mit Gefängnis bestraft wurde.

„Sie brauchen mich viel mehr als ich Sie.“
Alan Turing in seinem Vorstellungsgespräch (meine Übersetzung)

TIG_OFTrailer_23_ 2014-07-21 16:22:34

Benedict Cumberbatch als Alan Turing – aus einem Trailer. Screenshot: pb

Der Film von Regisseur Morton Tyldum hat alles, was ein guter Film braucht: er ist witzig, spannend, herzerwärmend und herzzerreißend. Und er ist zu allererst ein Film über Alan Turing (gespielt von Benedict Cumberbatch), der Großbritannien loyal diente, alle Geheimnisse über seine Arbeit in Bletchley Park wahrte und dafür nicht etwa mit allen Ehren bedacht wurde, die ein Land vergeben kann. Alan Turing wurde dafür bestraft, homosexuell zu sein und mit Östrogen behandelt, um ihn von der Homosexualität zu heilen. Außerdem hielt man ihn für unzuverlässig, Geheimnisse für sich behalten zu können und schloss ihn von seiner Arbeit als Kryptoanalytiker beim späteren britischen Geheimdienst aus.

Benedict Cumberbatchs beste Leistung

Benedict Cumberbatch gilt Kennern zurecht als einer der besten Schauspieler seiner Generation. In „The Imitation Game“ liefert er seine bisher beste schauspielerische Leistung auf der Kinoleinwand ab. Sein Alan ist verletzlich, arrogant, witzig, eigenbröterlisch und er tut und sagt immer genau das, was er in diesem Moment für richtig hält. Das wahre Können eines Schauspielers offenbart sich auch in dem, was er nicht sagt, dann nämlich, wenn ein Schauspieler mit einer einzigen Geste, einem einzigen Wimpernschlag einen ganzen Monolog erzählen kann. Das kann Benedict Cumberbatch den ganzen Film über, der in jedem Detail und mit jeder Rolle perfekt ist. Doch in der letzten Szene, die er zusammen mit Keira Knightley hat –  sie spielt Joan Clarke, eine Kollegin und Freundin, die auch noch nach Alan Turings Tod sehr viel für ihn empfunden hat – zeigt sich Benedict Cumberbatchs wahre Meisterschaft. Und die des Films, der auch in herzzerreißenden Szenen niemals kitschig ist.

„The Imitation Game“ ist ein Film, den man gesehen haben muss. Er verdient jede Auszeichnung, für die er bereits jetzt gehandelt wird.

 

Update: [25.Januar 2015]

Gestern habe ich die deutsche Fassung gesehen. Und ich muss zugeben: Sie ist nicht so schlimm wie ich befürchtet habe. Erst vor ein paar Tagen habe ich den deutschen Trailer noch einmal gesehen und war der festen Überzeugung, dass die Synchronisation grottenschlecht ist. Vor allem beim Vorstellungsgespräch zwischen Alan Turing (Sprecher: Tommy Morgenstern) und Commander Denniston (Leon Richter) hatte ich den Eindruck, dass beide Synchronstimmen überhaupt nicht zu denen der Schauspieler passen und viel zu hoch rüberkommen. Ein Eindruck, der sich dann auch bestätigt hat. Dass Tommy Morgenstern, der auch Sherlocks deutsche Stimme ist,  hier Benedict Cumberbatch seine Stimme leiht, hätte ich nicht gedacht. Sie klingt mir vergleichsweise viel zu hoch. Was aber sicher daran liegt, dass ich nicht nur an Benedicts tiefe Stimme gewöhnt bin, sondern auch daran, dass ich viel im englischen Original anschaue – dem Internet sei Dank. Daher wirken Synchronfassungen auf mich irgendwie flacher und zu sehr einem Hochdeutsch angepasst, dass im üblichen Sprachgebrauch so nicht verwendet wird. Das gilt auch für „The Imitation Game“.

Es ist sicher nicht leicht, eine Synchronisation zu machen: Vieles aus der Originalsprache ist schlichtweg nicht 1:1 ins Deutsche zu übersetzen, von der Koordination der Lippenbewegungen ganz zu schweigen. Weil nicht jeder einem Film auf Englisch (oder auch einer beliebigen anderen Sprache) folgen kann, ist sie dennoch hilfreich. Wer aber die Möglichkeit hat, die Originalfassung zu schauen, sollte das unbedingt tun. Auch wenn es vor allem für Ungeübte nicht leicht ist. Es lohnt sich!

Den englischen Trailer gibt es hier.


Hier gibt es den deutschen Trailer.

Grundlage für den Film ist das lesenswerte Buch von Andrew Hodges „Enigma“. Meinen englischen Buchtipp gibt es hier.

You can find the English version of this entry here.

David Lagercrantz: Fall of Man in Wilmslow 

It is a novel. A fiction, not a documentary about the life of Alan Turing. This is important because people tend to take every word for granted, weighing it carefully, comparing it to proved facts about the man who helped to break Nazi Germany’s Enigma code.

David Lagercrantz takes those facts and some more (Alan’s homosexuality, his somehow awkward behaviour, his genius) and unfolds his story from the very last day of Alan’s life and the moment his corpse is discovered by a local policeman. This man, Detective Constable Leonard Corell, takes a very special interest in this case that seems to be nothing more than suicide. Step by step he dives deeper into the life and thinking of Alan Turing – a journey which doesn’t leave his own life untouched.

„(I)f indeed anyone was an unbreakable code then it was Alan himself.“

„The Fall of the Man in Wilmslow“ is a thrilling story that hooks you from the very first page. If (and this is an if I only can claim for myself) you already know something about Alan Turing’s life and impact. Then you find hints you have read elsewhere, imagine pictures, films or documentaries you have seen or listen to and you will be able to find your pace between fact and fiction this novel is constantly mixing up. If you haven’t stumbled upon Alan Turing at all, you probably will be lost in between the complexity of the story that hops from the past to the present and back again, changes perspectives and comes  up with names and places you might find confusing because you have never heard of them. If you still want to find out more about Alan Turing, start with a biography (or click on the link given below).

FallOfMan

David Lagercrantz: Fall of the Man in Wilmslow. The death and life of Alan Turing. A Novel, MacLehose Press, about 9£.

You find more about Alan Turing here on my blog.

Sherlock: Die Braut des Grauens

Mit dem Special „Die Braut des Grauens“ verpflanzen die Macher die erfolgreiche britischen Serie von der Moderne in ihre Ursprünge. Am Ostermontag kommt die synchronisierte Fassung ins deutsche Fernsehen (ARD, 21.45 Uhr).

Was zunächst als Weihnachtsspecial angekündigt wurde, erblickte am 1. Januar 2016 das Licht der Fernsehöffentlichkeit. Oder zumindest der Öffentlichkeit, die auf welchem Wege auch immer die Erstausstrahlung im ersten Programm der britischen BBC anschauen konnte. Dem Rest der Fans blieb immerhin der zum Teil zeitversetzte Gang ins Kino, denn in vielen Ländern weltweit durfte die Originalfassung im Umfeld der Fernsehausstrahlung auf die große Leinwand – außer in den deutschsprachigen Ländern.

Denn in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz hat die ARD die Erstausstrahlungsrechte an der synchronisierten Fassung und damit ganz offenbar das Recht, eine Kinoausstrahlung zu verhindern. Eine Ausstrahlung, die wohlgemerkt im englischen Original gezeigt worden wäre und somit ein anderes Publikum angesprochen hätte. Entsprechende Fragen verärgerter Fans beantwortete die ARD lediglich mit der Standardantwort eine Ausstrahlung im Kino sei nur in unmittelbarer Nähe zu einer Ausstrahlung im Fernsehen möglich (oder auch mit der Bitte später noch einmal nachzufragen)– was nach Recherchen der deutschsprachigen Webseite „Sherlock-DE“ so nicht stimmt. Immerhin wurde in China und Belgien „Die Braut des Grauens“ im Kino gezeigt, obwohl in beiden Ländern keine Termine für eine Fernsehausstrahlung feststehen. In Großbritannien war die Rückkehr des Meisterdetektivs auf die Fernsehschirme ein Quotenerfolg für die BBC, die eine Einschaltquote von 40,2 Prozent vermeldete. Über die Feiertage war „Sherlock“ sogar die am meisten gesehene Sendung. Trotz der zeitgleichen Ausstrahlung ließen es sich 18.500 Fans nicht nehmen, „Sherlock“ im Kino zu genießen.

Eine Verneigung vor den Fans

Und ein Genuss war es tatsächlich. Wer nach den ersten Gerüchten, die Erfinder des zeitgenössischen „Sherlock“ Steven Moffat und Mark Gatiss würden ihre Version ins viktorianische England zurückversetzen, der Überzeugung war, beide hätten wahlweise den Verstand verloren oder seien am Ende ihrer Ideen angekommen, wird schon nach wenigen Minuten eines besseren belehrt. Zahlreiche Anspielungen und filmische Zitate aus den vorherigen Staffeln sind vor allem in den ersten Szenen nichts weniger als eine Verneigung vor den zahllosen Fans der Serie. Der Fortgang der Handlung und ihre Auflösung sind eine liebevolle Hommage an den Sherlock-Holmes-Erfinders Arthur Conan Doyle. Die Details erschließen sich wie auch schon bei den vorherigen Folgen erst bei mehrmaligem Anschauen, zu vielschichtig und scharfsinnig sind nicht nur die Dialoge – bei denen wie immer Benedict Cumberbatch den meisten Text lernen muss und in der unglaublichen Geschwindigkeit Sherlocks präzise artikuliert spricht. Martin Freeman als Dr. John Watson ist ihm ein mehr als ebenbürtiger Sparringspartner, der auch im viktorianischen Tweedanzug mehr ist als ein Wortgeber und tollpatischer Bewunderer. Zusammen sind sie ein kongeniales Team, das an Drehorten und im Studio so wirkt, als würden sie in ihren Schauspielerleben nie etwas anderes tun.

Erfolgreiche Hauptdarsteller

Dabei haben es wohl beide Schauspieler nicht mehr nötig, in die berühmte Adresse Baker Street 221B zurückzukehren. Martin Freeman wurde spätestens mit der dreiteiligen Verfilmung des „Hobbit“ einem weltweiten Millionenpublikum bekannt, stand als „Richard III“ auf der Bühne und faszinierte in der ersten Staffel der Fernsehserie „Fargo“. Benedict Cumberbatch brach im vergangenen Jahr als „Hamlet“ die Vorverkaufsrekorde für Londoner Theater, erhielt für seine Darstellung des Codeknackers Alan Turing in „The Imitation Game“ eine Oscar-Nominierung und stand  gerade als „Doctor Strange“ für die Titelrolle des Marvel-Helden vor der Kamera. Die vollen Terminkalender beider Hauptdarsteller sind wohl auch ein Grund dafür, dass neue „Sherlock“-Folgen nur im zweijährigen Rhythmus ausgestrahlt werden – wenn die Fans Glück haben. Doch sowohl Benedict Cumberbatch als auch Martin Freeman mögen die Serie offensichtlich, und die Macher arrangieren die Dreharbeiten entsprechend: die vierte Staffel wird im April diesen Jahres gedreht, eine Ausstrahlung in britischen Fernsehen könnte Anfang 2017 folgen.

Den Trailer zur „Braut des Grauens“ gibt es hier.

You find my review of „The Abominable Bride“ here.

 

So it’s Doctor Strange then

„I’m never bored“, John Watson says to Mycroft when asked what it is like living with his brother Sherlock. The same is true for Benedict Cumberbatch’s fans: When the actor isn’t busy solving crimes as the highly functioning sociopath who will be back in the special „The Abominable Bride“ on New Year’s Day on BBC One he dives into all kind of topics – and takes the Cumbercollective on a fantastic trip into the unknown.

On that trip we  learned about Enigma and the Codebreakers at Bletchley Park when Benedict played Alan Turing in „The Imitation Game“. In  „Black Mass“ we found ourselves in Boston in the 1970s where Benedict as William Bulger is not only a senator but also the brother of the criminal Whitey Bulger (Johnny Depp). We read William Shakespeare’s „Hamlet“ (again) to prepare for Benedict’s performance at the Barbican earlier this year. Luckily this was not only a once in a lifetime experience but another step in the career of that amazing actor who will be Richard III in the second series of BBC Two’s „The Hollow Crown“ to be aired some when in 2016. (Because it’s a three part series, better prepare for it and read Henry VI and Richard III.).

And so it’s Doctor Strange then. A fictional superhero who protects earth from mysterious villains with the help of his own magical abilities – at least that is what I have learned so far. But it’s still time for diving into the unknown world of Marvel, open a new door and proving the fact that Benedict is just fantastic.

Doctor Strange will be released in the UK on 28th October.

Letters of Note II

The moment you free that huge coffee table book from its packings, you feel that is indeed something special. This is of course because of its size (21 x 3,5 x 28,9 cm) but it is also because of its content. As I wrote before when I had the first volume in my hands, „Letters of Note, Volume II“ again makes letters available for readers and lure them into a very special place. The place – maybe the living room – is a very private one, normally not open for strangers, a place where letters were written in a time when the internet wasn’t even thought of.

So this book is a treat to dive into, to flick through its pages and get hooked by facsimiles, pictures or the name of the writer or their receivers. You want to have it within reach to hold it and re read certain letters again, so do make room on your shelves. And you’ll get letters by Abraham Lincoln, Aldous Huxley, Janis Joplin, Charlotte Brontë, Michelangelo, Alan Turing, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Florence Nightingale and many more. They tell stories of their writers, give  little insight looks into their lives at a special moment in time and will never leave you untouched.

LettersOfNote2

Photo: Petra Breunig

You will find different editions but even if you love reading ebooks (as I do), do yourself a favour and go for a hardcopy. It’s worth the money.

Unbound is a way of crowdfunding books directly by supporting their authors. Depending on how much money you want to spend, you get goodies and of course the books you are supporting. After signing up for Unbound – which is for free – and you have made up your mind to support a book you want to get to life, you’re getting emails keeping you updated on the progress the book is making.

Shaun Usher, Letters of Note II,  Unbound.

[Note: I was one of the subscribers and am very happy that this book  wouldn’t exist without me, as Shaun Usher wrote.

« Ältere Beiträge

© 2017 diebedra.de

Theme von Anders NorénHoch ↑

Diese Seite verwendet Cookies. Wenn Du hier bleibst, gehe ich davon aus, dass Du damit einverstanden bist. This site uses cookies. By continuing browsing, you are agreeing to use of cookies. Weitere Informationen

Die Cookie-Einstellungen auf dieser Website sind auf "Cookies zulassen" eingestellt, um das beste Surferlebnis zu ermöglichen. Wenn du diese Website ohne Änderung der Cookie-Einstellungen verwendest oder auf "Akzeptieren" klickst, erklärst du sich damit einverstanden.

Schließen